Trans Adirondack Route thru-hikers like to get away from it all, and they may possess a friendly competitive spirit. In adventure sports parlance, a fastest known time, often shortened to "FKT," is a record of who traversed what the fastest. Friends of the Trans Adirondack Route is a fan of fastest known times since traversing wild land quickly demonstrates a person's fitness, drive, and conscientiousness. We recognize two styles of fastest known times – supported and unsupported.

During supported attempts, almost anything goes. Runners are usually fully supported by a crew that cooks their food, resupplies them at road crossings, shuttles their gear, etc. During a supported attempt, two rules apply. 1) Cover the entire route. 2) Navigate by map and compass only (no use of GPS, phone, satellite devices, etc.).

During unsupported attempts, anything doesn't go. Each person may develop their own opinion as to what "unsupported" means, and consensus will never be reached. Friends of the Trans Adirondack Route demands unsupported thru-hikers follow five rules. 1) Hike the entire route. 2) Navigate by map and compass only (no use of GPS, phone, satellite devices, etc.) 3) Carry all your own gear. 4) Resupply no more than three times. 5) Stay in accommodations (motels, hostels, friends' houses, etc.) no more than three nights. 6) Don't be a weenie by overthinking it. If someone offers you a soda because you look thirsty, don't worry about that act of kindness effecting your fastest known time attempt.

Supported records
No supported record attempted

Unsupported records
Erik Schlimmer in 2010
August 6 at 3:47 p.m. to August 18 at 3:47 p.m. 12 days, 0 hours, 0 minutes
Route was 236.4 miles long at that time = 19.7 miles per day

Marilyne Marchand Gouin in 2015
August 25 at 7:57 a.m. to September 4 at 2:43 p.m. 10 days, 6 hours, 46 minutes
Route was 236.4 miles long at that time = 23.0 miles per day


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